One of the world's most powerful supercomputers also fight against COVID-19

Image result for One of the world's most powerful supercomputers also fight against COVID-19

All the help to fight against the COVID-19 ... is little. Therefore, different technology companies are putting their computing power at the service of researchers to try to stop the video, and one of them, IBM, has put its supercomputer IBM Summit to work.
Researchers need a beastly computing power to develop effective measures against the coronavirus. Stopping the curve, and reversing it, is the priority in many countries, and Nvidia already invited us a few days ago to donate ... the power of our graphics!
With an initiative with Stanford University, Nvidia made available software to donate processing power from our high-end graphics cards to investigate solutions to the coronavirus. Now it is IBM that announces its way of operating, and it is not with user hardware, but with one of the world's most powerful supercomputers.

Image result for One of the world's most powerful supercomputers also fight against COVID-19

Supercomputers, or supercomputers, are computers that are glued to each other in a huge room with a fairly low temperature, their tasks are diverse, and many are currently developing artificial intelligence. Now, the Summit is going to be in charge of helping to combat COVID-19.
The IBM Summit is, since 2018, the world's most powerful supercomputer. Priced at around $ 200 million and rated at 200 petaflops, it was previously in use at the OAK Ridge National Laboratory, where a host of science and technology programs are being investigated for the U.S. Department of Energy.
The team that IBM is going to put at the service of researchers trying for the coronavirus will have, as we read on ZDNet, computing power of more than 330 petaflops thanks to its 775,000-core CPU and 34,000 GPU cores.

Image result for One of the world's most powerful supercomputers also fight against COVID-19

The IBM Summit that researchers can use will perform a large number of calculations in epidemiology, bioinformatics and molecular modelling. By not using equipment like this, it would take months for researchers to complete those calculations (years if the calculations are done by hand). And it is estimated that the supercomputer can do 200,000 million calculations per second.
The good news is that the supercomputer is already working and, so far, it has simulated more than 8,000 compounds to detect what may be useful against the coronavirus. So far, researchers have identified 77 drug compounds that could help curb the epidemic.
We will see how research progresses to stop this global disease, but having the power of a team like this is undoubtedly a step forward to accelerate the discovery of a vaccine.

Post a Comment

0 Comments